The setting

The setting

HOUSED IN ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BUILDINGS IN NICE

The Gaglio brasserie is situated on the edge of Old Nice at a stone’s throw from the nearest tramway line. It covers two wood and gold-clad floors that were once home to a jewellery shop owned by Vincent Gaglio Jr, whose bronzed-lettered name still graces the facade.

The building boasts a typically Niçoise yellow facade crowned with a stunning Belle Epoque dome. Nestled on Place Saint François, the Gaglio’s inviting terrace faces the Promenade du Paillon gardens and is halfway between Nice’s legendary Masséna and Garibaldi squares

A ATTRACTIVELY-PRICED, CHIC BRASSERIE

The Gaglio brasserie has a wonderfully traditional French feel.
Whether you’re relaxing on the brasserie-style woven chairs that dot its large, sunny terrace, or enjoying a meal under its dining room chandeliers, the Gaglio is a welcoming brasserie that blends tradition with a modern twist. Its first floor windows look onto the famous Masséna Lycee and across the Paillon gardens where you can watch the world go by.

MOUTH-WATERING DISHES

The Gaglio serves typical French Mediterranean dishes (rib-eye steaks, beef tartare, seared prawns, Spanish pulled pork…), local specialities with a Corsican touch and daily menus prepared using seasonal produce.

When tea time arrives you can tickle your taste buds with delicious home-made pastries and ice creams.
 

Let yourself be waited on hand and foot by our welcoming team, who only offer the highest standard of service.

THE GAGLIO BRASSERIE, ON THE EDGE OF OLD NICE

Before settling down for a bite to eat at the Gaglio, take a stroll around Place Saint François, which was once home to a 13th Century Franciscan convent.
It was abandoned at the start of the French Revolution and largely demolished in the years that followed. It re-opened as the Golden Eagle Hotel, although it was later purchased by Nice’s local authority. The remains of the convent’s church now house an ice cream shop and municipal services on the ground floor, while a cinema and dance hall can be found on the first floor.
Slightly further afield, you’ll find the Palais Communal with its typically Turin-style Baroque architecture that dates back to 1574. It was Nice’s former town hall, but was looted and ransacked in 1792 by French troops. The local authority took over the building in 2009 and is planning to turn it into a museum once Place Saint François has been renovated and pedestrianised.
If you fancy musing over local folklore while enjoying a break at the Gaglio, you’ll be interested to know that the Saint François alley, which leads off the square, is nicknamed the ‘lou roumpe-cùou’ – a ‘blind alley’ that in Niçois culture refers to people slipping and falling head over heels on its once precarious steps!